Music Cruises Promise Access, Good Times

There have been changes in business models that been beneficial to those companies mentioned above that either saw the future and embraced it. There have also been companies that have struggled along the way. Some companies, like The New York Times, are trying to find their way while others like Newsweek have been forced to embrace an all digital model. Beneath the distributors of content Apple, Spotify, Pandora, newspaper and magazine publishers and so on the ripple effect is also being felt on content creators musicians, authors and the like. While authors are seeing their articles and books downloaded, musicians have seen the playing field shift from consumers having to buy entire albums regardless of the format to individual tracks. No loner does the the music industry book the bulk of its revenue on a per album basis, but rather on digital singles. Despite that economic shift, airplay on broadcast is still the number one determinate of whether a song is a hit or a bust. For generations, music played on broadcast radio was viewed as promotional material for the artists. While companies in other industries pay to get their material on the air through ad sales, musicians and their record labels get their promotions for free. Even today, 240 million Americans still listen to broadcast radio, even as competition for listeners becomes stiffer thanks to MP3 players like iPods and cell phones, satellite and Internet radio. Even as Internet radio grows in popularity and I expect it will given the install base of Apples new iRadio, the costs make profitability difficult to achieve because the government royalty board at the Library of Congress determined that Internet radio stations like Pandora pay six times the royalty rate of other mediums. Some in the music industry have recognized the changing landscape and have begun negotiating comprehensive deals that acknowledge the current multi dimensional aspect of the industry today.

Past cruises have included John Mayer, 311, Pepper, Rick Springfield, Boyz II Men, Sister Hazel, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Hootie and the Blowfish, Colbie Caillat, Shinedown, Lifehouse, 3 Doors Down, Train, Zac Brown Band, Barenaked Ladies, Guster, and dozens of other artists. Here are several upcoming musical cruises that feature seriously large names in jazz, bluegrass, rock, pop, country, and more on some of the industry’s most well-known vessels. Kid Rock’s Chillin’ the Most Cruise Like him or hate him, one thing is for sure: Kid Rock knows how to party, and so do his fans. In March 2014, Kid Rock’s 5th Annual “Chillin’ the Most Cruise” departs on Norwegian Pearl from Miami to Key West for some craziness on Bourbon Street, as well as the cruise line’s private island in the Bahamas. The beaches of Great Stirrup Cay will be transformed into a “redneck paradise,” so crack those PBR’s open and get ready for let loose. If four nights onboard aren’t enough, there is also an option to book the “pre-cruise party” and stay an extra night onboard before the main events get underway. kidrockcruise.com/ PRIVATE ISLANDS: The ultimate cruise perk Jazz Cruises Holland America takes the concept of the traditional jazz boats of the Mississippi River to a modern level with a jazz cruise to San Juan, Turks and Caicos, St. Maarten, and a cruise-line owned island in the Bahamas . The week-long “Jazz Cruise” departs from Ft. Lauderdale in January 2014 on the Eurodam with a lineup that includes the Clayton Brothers Quintet, Bill Charlap Trio, Ann Hampton Callaway Quartet, Freddy Cole Trio, Ernie Adams, John Allred, and more than 30 additional performers. thejazzcruise.com/2014 For jazz fans on the West Coast who would prefer a sailing closer to home, the same cruise line offers the “Smooth Jazz Cruise” from San Diego this October onboard the Westerdam . The seven-night voyage includes the coast of Baja California, a stop in Puerto Vallarta, and Cabo San Lucas.